flickr:

Spiral by Ghita Katz Olsen on Flickr.
Lamp designed by Olafur Eliasson in Copenhagen Opera.

flickr:

Spiral by Ghita Katz Olsen on Flickr.

Lamp designed by Olafur Eliasson in Copenhagen Opera.

zerostatereflex:

Detailed View of a Solar Eclipse Corona 
"Only in the fleeting darkness of a total solar eclipse is the light of the solar corona easily visible."

zerostatereflex:

Detailed View of a Solar Eclipse Corona

"Only in the fleeting darkness of a total solar eclipse is the light of the solar corona easily visible."

"Daughter of the moon
And daughter of the seas
Daughter of the winds
And daughter of the leaves"

Daughter of the Elements, Lisa Thiel (via wtchcrvft)
thedemon-hauntedworld:

Saturn at Equinox How would Saturn look if its ring plane pointed right at the Sun? Before August of 2009 nobody knew. Every 15 years, as seen from Earth, Saturn’s rings point toward the Earth and appear to disappear. The disappearing rings are no longer a mystery — Saturn’s rings are known to be so thin and the Earth is so near the Sun that when the rings point toward the Sun, they also point nearly edge-on at the Earth. Fortunately, in this third millennium, humanity is advanced enough to have a spacecraft that can see the rings during equinox from the side. The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft, Cassini, was able to snap a series of unprecedented pictures of Saturn’s rings during equinox. A digital composite of 75 such images is shown above. The rings appear unusually dark, and a very thin ring shadow line can be made out on Saturn’s cloud-tops. Objects sticking out of the ring plane are brightly illuminated and cast long shadows. Inspection of these images may help humanity understand the specific sizes of Saturn’s ring particles and the general dynamics of orbital motion.
Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

thedemon-hauntedworld:

Saturn at Equinox
How would Saturn look if its ring plane pointed right at the Sun? Before August of 2009 nobody knew. Every 15 years, as seen from Earth, Saturn’s rings point toward the Earth and appear to disappear. The disappearing rings are no longer a mystery — Saturn’s rings are known to be so thin and the Earth is so near the Sun that when the rings point toward the Sun, they also point nearly edge-on at the Earth. Fortunately, in this third millennium, humanity is advanced enough to have a spacecraft that can see the rings during equinox from the side. The Saturn-orbiting spacecraft, Cassini, was able to snap a series of unprecedented pictures of Saturn’s rings during equinox. A digital composite of 75 such images is shown above. The rings appear unusually dark, and a very thin ring shadow line can be made out on Saturn’s cloud-tops. Objects sticking out of the ring plane are brightly illuminated and cast long shadows. Inspection of these images may help humanity understand the specific sizes of Saturn’s ring particles and the general dynamics of orbital motion.

Credit: Cassini Imaging Team, ISS, JPL, ESA, NASA

fuckyeahfluiddynamics:

Earth is not the only planet in our solar system with auroras. As the solar wind—a stream of rarefied plasma from our sun—blows through the solar system, it interacts with the magnetic fields of other planets as well as our own. Saturn’s magnetic field second only to Jupiter’s in strength. This strong magnetosphere deflects many of the solar wind’s energetic particles, but, as on Earth, some of the particles get drawn in along Saturn’s magnetic field lines. These lines converge at the poles, where the high-energy particles interact with the gases in the upper reaches of Saturn’s atmosphere. As a result, Saturn, like Earth, has impressive and colorful light displays around its poles. (Image credit: ESA/Hubble, M. Kornmesser & L. Calçada, source video; via spaceplasma)

sickpage:

Jim RichardsonNew York at Night, 2007

sickpage:

Jim Richardson
New York at Night, 2007